ISSN 1556-6757


SJI 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 
 
 
Volume 1, Issue 1, 2009, ISSN 1948-5816
 
 
Antiretroviral HIV Therapy at TASO Clinic in Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda: Medical, Cultural and Ethical Factors Influencing ART   Galina Boyarinova


Abstract

Uganda faces many challenges in its battle against the HIV/AIDS epidemic. A complex web of social, cultural, medical and ethical factors affect the treatment. Patients cited side effects of drugs, lack of adequate nutrition, and fear of “abrupt death” as the main medical concerns they faced with antiretroviral treatment. Social and cultural factors affecting the ART included the expenses required in traveling to the clinic as well as long waits once they had reached there. From a healthcare perspective, the limited supply of drugs, lack of support for patients, and shortage of staff to treat the increasing number of patients were the main challenges facing HIV treatment.  Full Article





Mapping Cognitive Rehabilitation in Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI): A Case Study
Syed Tajuddin Syed Hassanand Husna Jamaludin

 

Abstract

There has been no report on detailed temporal mapping of traumatic brain injury (TBI), especially diffuse axonal injury (DAI), rehabilitation process. A case study is presented here on four-year tracking of a 24-year old male adolescent with severe DAI. The study aimed to develop a theoretical visual model of TBI (DAI) cognitive rehabilitation, and to validate this model by mapping out the sequence of significant behaviour events. The ensuing spiral cone model concurs with two well-known TBI rehabilitation sequels. The sequence of cognitive rehabilitation should aid in planning interventions in other similar or comparable TBI (DAI) patients.

Full Article





Survive or Thrive: Implications of Trinity Paradigm of Intelligence in Nursing Education
Masoud Ghaffari  and Diana Conco
 

Abstract

The shortage of professional nurses is a matter of great concern for nurse educators and health care organizations, at the national level and internationally. Nurse educators face daily challenges in their role as educators while they strive to transform teaching practices for the future. Many of the issues are new, complex, and require creative approaches. The issue of stress in nursing education, though not new, has manifested itself in new challenging ways that require creative, intuitive, and practical coping strategies. Nurturing students to become creative, intuitive, and mindful will lead to the development of an intelligent being. This paper explores student nurses’ perceived academic stressors and their strategies for coping. The Trinity Paradigm of Intelligence (TPI), as a holistic paradigm of human intelligence, will be used as a guide to present the emergent data systematically. The concept of intelligent nursing education will be delineated and implications of the findings in nursing education will be discussed.

Full Article