ISSN 1556-6757


SJI 


 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Volume 1, Issue 1, 2013

 
 

Identity and Intimacy in Apuleius’ “Cupid and Psyche”

Ya-huei Wang

Abstract

According to Erikson (1968), women are unable to have a well-developed identity without intimate relationships with others. In other words, women need to maintain intimate relationships with others as a way of securing their own identities. Following this argument, if women are cut off from human

attachments and isolated from the outside world, they would have difficulty establishing their own identities. Psyche in Apuleius’ tale “Cupid and Psyche” encounters such difficulties. The paper illustrates women’s desire to form intimate relationships with others as a way of securing their own identities. Through a series of disciplinary labors, Psyche realizes that in order to win her lover back and secure her own identity, she has to be guided by her feminine characteristics and reconcile herself to masculine authority. Through reaffirming her willingness for female self-sacrifice and self-subjugation to the male’s authority, Psyche secures her own identity in her intimate relationship with Cupid. Full Article.